Shrine of Hazrat Ali A.S (Rauza E Hazrat Ali A.S)



Hazrat Ali is the father of Imam Hussain (A.S)the greatest martyred on earth.Hazrat Ali is known by several names like Al-Murtaza, Al-Amir-ul-Mo'mineen, Abu-Turab, Asadullah,Kunyat - Abul Hasan,Maula Mushkeel Qusha.Maula Ali (A.S) is son of Abu Talib-ibne-Abdul Muttalib & Fatima bint-e-Asad (S.A).He was the only man to be born in the Kabah (The house of God).He was the first to compile and codify the Quran. He was the first to offer homage to the Holy Prophet (PBUH&HF).He was the first to have the honor of being nominated by the Holy Prophet (PBUH&HF) as his successor, testator and vice regent. The honor of owning a house which opened into the courtyard of the Prophet's (PBUH&HF) mosque was reserved for Imam Ali (as) alone. He was the first to be styled as "brother" by the Prophet (PBUH&HF) and on every occasion. He was the first to give burial to the Prophet (PBUH&HF). He was the first to be appointed commander in all those battles in which the Holy Prophet (PBUH&HF) did not participate personally. The honor of the propagation of the Quranic Sura, "al Bara'at" fell to Imam Ali's (as) lot.... and many more
When u fall in any difficulties in your life time just take the name of our greatest Imam "YA ALI MADAD" your difficulties will Surely get away from your life very soon.
Imam ALI (A.S)Died - at the age of 63 years, at Kufa, on Monday, the 21st Ramadan 40 AH, murdered by an assassin who mortally wounded him with a poisoned sword in the Mosque at Kufa during morning prayers on the 19th of Ramadan.
Buried - Najaf, near Kufa.
The story the founding of the shrine indicates that, shortly after the murder of Ali and the burial of his body at Najaf, near Baghdad, some of Ali's followers worried that his body would be desecrated by his enemies, and they placed his remains on a white female camel. Ali's followers traveled with the camel for several weeks, until the camel ultimately fell to the ground exhausted. The body was then reburied where the camel fell. The body was said to be rediscovered there in the 12th century.According to tradition, Mazar-i-Sharif owes its existence to a dream. At the beginning of the 12th century, a local mullah had a dream in which Ali bin Abi Talib, the prophet's cousin and son-in-law and first Shia Imam and one of the four Rightly Guided Caliphs appeared to reveal that he had been secretly buried near the city of Balkh. After investigation and the opening of the tomb, the Seljuk sultan Sanjar ordered a city and shrine to be built on the spot, where it stood until its destruction by Genghis Khan. Although later rebuilt, Mazar stood in the shadow of its neighbor Balkh, until that city was abandoned in 1866 for health reasons.
The Seljuq dynasty sultan Ahmed Sanjar rebuilt the first shrine at this location. it was destroyed by Genghis Khan in the invasion around 1220. It was rebuilt in the 15th century by Husain Baiqara.[3] Most of the shrine's decorations, however, are the result of modern restoration work.[1] One of the few remaining artifacts from the earlier shrine is a marble slab inscribed with the words, "Ali, Lion of God."2313
A site plan of the location made in the 1910s shows that there had earlier been a smaller walled precinct in the mosque, which were razed to create parklands later, although the portals to this precincts still remain as gateways for the shrine.
Tombs of varying dimensions were added for a number of Afghan political and religious leaders over the years, which has led to the development of its current irregular dimensions. These include the square domed tomb of Amir Dost Muhammad, Wazir Akbar Khan and a similar structure for Amir Sher Ali and his family.
video

Islamic Historical Buildings

Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Festival of Pome-Granate in Iran



It is said that is Pome-Granate  from jannah and it is much Curative for humans and its each Grain has Restoration for a man, Allah granted it to us for our health and taste, its all parts have much benefits for us, its seed, its Juice and its Shell is used for medicines in medical treatments  

video

Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


The Bey Othmane Mosque



Oran (Arabic: وهران‎, Arabic pronunciation: [Wahrān]) is a major city on the northwestern Mediterranean coast of Algeria, and the second largest city of the country.
It is the capital of the Oran Province (wilaya). The city has a population of 759,645 (2008), while the metropolitan area has a population of approximately 1,500,000, making it the second largest city in Algeria. Oran is a major port, and since the 1960s has been the commercial, industrial, and educational centre of western Algeria.The Spaniards occupied the city until 1708, when the Turkish Bey, Mustapha Ben Youssef (Bouchelaghem) took advantage of the War of Spanish Succession to drive them out.
In 1732, Spanish forces, under José Carrillo de Albornoz captured the city from Bey Hassan in the Battle of Aïn-el-Turk.In the night after October 8, 1790, a violent earthquake claimed more than 3,000 victims in less than seven minutes. Thereafter Charles IV saw no advantage in continuing the occupation of the city, which had become increasingly expensive and perilous. He initiated discussions with the Bey of Algiers. A treaty handing over the city was signed on September 12, 1792. After another earthquake had damaged the Spanish defences, Bey Ben Othman's forces took possession of Oran on October 8 of the same year. In 1792, the Ottomans settled a Jewish community there. In 1796, the Pasha Mosque (in honour of Hassan Pasha, Dey of Algeria), was built by the Turks with ransom money paid for the release of Spanish prisoners after Spain's final departure. In 1830 the Beys moved their capital from Mascara to Oran.
The town of 10,000 inhabitants was still in the possession of the Ottoman Empire, when a squadron under the command of captain Bourmand seized el-Kébir on December 14, 1830. The city was in a wretched state. On January 4, 1831, the French commanded by General Damrémont occupied Oran. In September 1830 the King appointed a police chief with the function of mayor in Algiers. In September 1831, General Berthezène made Mr. Pujol, captain of cavalry in retirement and wounded at the right hand under the Empire, mayor of Oran. In 1832, at the head of five thousand men, a young Emir called Abd al-Qadir attacks Oran. In April 1833, commander-in-chief, General Boyer, leaves Oran and is replaced by the baron Louis Alexis Desmichels. The cities defenders,under attack by Abd el Kader, holds their ground .
Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Magic History 1 (Jews Satan and Zionists)



Jews say that Prophet Solomon when destroyed many countries who did not worship Allah, there Solomon A.S got many more books of Magic and Solomon A.S learnt Magic from those books and with the help of that magic Prophet Solomon was succeeded to defeat Jinns and Devil
it means that history and basis of Magic in ''Judaism'' , Zionists are very deep, they also use Kibala (Qibala) magic1ساحری اور سامری
Chemistry is also an magic , Muslim scenarist did with chemistry very good and they never tried to do any thing against the Rules of Allah,
but after 17 A.D , Jews started to interfere in Divine rules of Allah.
They did many thing which were not allowed in this world by a human but they and we are doing,,,,,,,
Chemistry, Bio, Physics etc. have some boundaries and lines but they and we have crossed all lines and boundaries, this an documentary in which we will watch history of Cinema, it will show us , How Cinema and Videos making invented and how audio was mixed in Videos and how Zionists are till now using Cinema to achieve their evil purposes, a great informative documentary, Must Watch
video

Magic History 2 (Jews Satan and Zionists)

Trip Towards Death 1 Urdu (Livingness, Agedness & Dying)

Trip Towards Death 2 Urdu (Livingness, Agedness & Dying)

Quranic Morals (Values) Solution to Issues of World

Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Islamic Historical Buildings



Welcome to Islamic Historical Buildings Page  This Page is dedicated to bringing together information on places of historical Islamic significance in order to rediscover our heritage and help inform the Ummah.
Please note that some of the places featured on this Page cannot be verified for certain. The knowledge of these places has been passed down through the ages and in some cases more than one location make claim to hosting the same historical place. In such instances Urdu Movies Site  has shown the most commonly believed site. And Allah (swt) knows best.
Please also note that the sites shown are only for information purposes in order to raise more awareness of our history and heritage. Under no circumstances should anyone pray to any tomb or shrine as this constitutes an act of shirk.

Rounded Dome (The Gol Gumbaz) Mausoleum of Muhammad 'Adil Shah




Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Charminar (Four Tower Historical Building)



Charminar built in 1591 AD, is a landmark monument located in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. The English name is a transliteration and combination of the Urdu words Chār and Minar, translating to "Four Towers"; the eponymous towers are ornate minarets attached and supported by four grand arches. The landmark has become a global icon of Hyderabad, listed among the most recognized structures of India. The Charminar is on the east bank of Musi river. To the northeast lies the Laad Bazaar and in the west end lies the granite-made richly ornamented Makkah Masjid.
Sultan Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah, the fifth ruler of the Qutb Shahi dynasty built Charminar in 1591 AD, shortly after he had shifted his capital from Golkonda to what is now known as Hyderabad. He built this famous structure to commemorate the elimination of a plague epidemic from this city. He is said to have prayed for the end of a plague that was ravaging his city and vowed to build a masjid (Islamic mosque) at the very place where he was praying. In 1591 while laying the foundation of Charminar, Quli Qutb Shah prayed: "Oh Allah, bestow unto this city peace and prosperity. Let millions of men of all castes, creeds and religions make it their abode, like fish in the water.[citation needed]"
The mosque became popularly known as Charminar because of its four (Persian/Hindi char = four) minarets (Minar (Arabic manara) = spire/tower).
It is said that, during the Mughal Governorship between Qutb Shahi and Asaf Jahi rule, the south western minaret "fell to pieces" after being struck by lightning and "was forthwith repaired" at a cost of Rs 60,000. In 1824, the monument was replastered at a cost of Rs 100,000.
In its heyday, the Charminar market had some 14,000 shops. Today the famous markets known as Laad Baazar and Pather Gatti, near the Charminar, are a favour, of tourists and locals alike for jewellery, especially known for exquisite bangles and pearls respectively.
In 2007, Hyderabadi Muslims living in Pakistan constructed a small-scaled quasi replica of the Charminar at the main crossing of the Bahadurabad neighborhood in Karachi.
Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Rounded Dome (The Gol Gumbaz) Mausoleum of Muhammad 'Adil Shah



The Gol (Round) Gumbaz (Dome) is the mausoleum of Muhammad Adil Shah (r. 1627-1656) of the Adil Shahi dynasty of Bijapur. It appears to have been the desire of the ruler to build a mausoleum that was comparable to that of his father, Ibrahim Adil Shah II. Since his father's mausoleum, known as the Ibrahim Rauza, was exceptional in composition and decoration, the only means of avoiding direct competition was through size. It is one of the biggest single chamber structures in the world and covers an area of 18,225 square feet (1,693 square meters), which is bigger than the better known Pantheon in Rome which is 14,996 square feet (1,393 square meters). The mausoleum is part of a complex that includes a mosque, a dharmshala (inn for travelers) and other buildings related to the sovereign's mausoleum. The building was never properly completed as intended since construction began towards the end of Muhammad Adil Shah's reign. As a result, the tomb is a plain cube with towers on each corner.
VISIBLE CONTENT HERE

video
Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Construction of Taj Mahal, Agra, India Completed (09 May)



Taj Mahal is regarded as one of the eight wonders of the world, and some Western historians have noted that its architectural beauty has never been surpassed. The Taj is the most beautiful monument built by the Mughals, the Muslim rulers of India. Taj Mahal is built entirely of white marble. Its stunning architectural beauty is beyond adequate description, particularly at dawn and sunset. The Taj seems to glow in the light of the full moon. On a foggy morning, the visitors experience the Taj as if suspended when viewed from across the Jamuna river.
Taj Mahal was built by a Muslim, Emperor Shah Jahan (died 1666 C.E.) in the memory of his dear wife and queen Mumtaz Mahal at Agra, India. It is an "elegy in marble" or some say an expression of a "dream." Taj Mahal (meaning Crown Palace) is a Mausoleum that houses the grave of queen Mumtaz Mahal at the lower chamber. The grave of Shah Jahan was added to it later. The queen’s real name was Arjumand Banu. In the tradition of the Mughals, important ladies of the royal family were given another name at their marriage or at some other significant event in their lives, and that new name was commonly used by the public. Shah Jahan's real name was Shahab-ud-din, and he was known as Prince Khurram before ascending to the throne in 1628.
Taj Mahal was constructed over a period of twenty-two years, employing twenty thousand workers. It was completed in 1648 C.E. at a cost of 32 Million Rupees. The construction documents show that its master architect was Ustad ‘Isa, the renowned Islamic architect of his time. The documents contain names of those employed and the inventory of construction materials and their origin. Expert craftsmen from Delhi, Qannauj, Lahore, and Multan were employed. In addition, many renowned Muslim craftsmen from Baghdad, Shiraz and Bukhara worked on many specialized tasks.
The Taj stands on a raised, square platform (186 x 186 feet) with its four corners truncated, forming an unequal octagon. The architectural design uses the interlocking arabesque concept, in which each element stands on its own and perfectly integrates with the main structure. It uses the principles of self-replicating geometry and a symmetry of architectural elements.
Its central dome is fifty-eight feet in diameter and rises to a height of 213 feet. It is flanked by four subsidiary domed chambers. The four graceful, slender minarets are 162.5 feet each. The entire mausoleum (inside as well as outside) is decorated with inlaid design of flowers and calligraphy using precious gems such as agate and jasper. The main archways, chiseled with passages from the Holy Qur’an and the bold scroll work of flowery pattern, give a captivating charm to its beauty. The central domed chamber and four adjoining chambers include many walls and panels of Islamic decoration.
The mausoleum is a part of a vast complex comprising of a main gateway, an elaborate garden, a mosque (to the left), a guest house (to the right), and several other palatial buildings. The Taj is at the farthest end of this complex, with the river Jamuna behind it. The large garden contains four reflecting pools dividing it at the center. Each of these four sections is further subdivided into four sections and then each into yet another four sections. Like the Taj, the garden elements serve like Arabesque, standing on their own and also constituting the whole.
video
Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Hassan Tower (Rabat City of Marrakech)



Rabat city takes pride in having more than 50 mosques in the early twentieth century, most were the artistic work of the Moroccan kings (dynasty present). The most prestigious of them never was a place ofRabat Tour Hassan worship: the Hassan Tower is actually the minaret that was never finished and what should have been not only the largest mosque in the world, but also the largest religious building in the world .
The mosque Hassan was therefore improperly called Hassan Tower.
We know a lot of this gigantic work but the origin of the name is not known : the name, the name of a tribe nor name of the supervisor?
The only certainty is the date of commencement, 1196, and the name of the initiator, Yacoub El Mansour (Almohad dynasty). He wanted Rabat to be the capital of his empire, but he died three years later in 1199.
Hassan Tower remained an unfinished mosque. His successors did not experience the need or time to complete the work. Slowly the building deteriorated and the materials were thoroughly looted. The earthquake of 1755 completely destroyed the colonnades.Rabat Bouregreg
Here is something you probably did not know about Rabat city: On the site of Chellah appeared the first traces of man in the eighth century BC.
Before it was called Rabat city, the Romans gave the name "sala" to the city. They also built a river port, but it was destroyed at the end of the Roman Empire.
Rabat city became the administrative capital of Morocco in 1912 when General Lyautey instituted French protection.
The decision will be imposed on the Sultan Moulay Youssef. The French nationals will modernize Rabat.
Mohamed V later kept Rabat cityas capital after the French protectorate in 1956.
The choice to maintain its capital Rabat is also confirmed by Hassan II in 1961 and Mohamed VI in 1999. The latter two will keep the tradition of the Moroccan king who wants to be present in various palaces of Morocco.
Today Rabat is the second town in the country. It is also one of the cities where there are more flowers and also the city's most preserved in Morocco. the other side of the city is called Sale.
The city of Sale is in the vicinity of Rabat city. This town was known until the late sixteenth century for its pirates. They threw in the collision of enemy ships.
The minaret (tower) is 44 meters above ground, but if we stick to the criteria of Almohad architecture (5 heights for 1 wide), it would have amounted to over 80 meters and beyond and the Koutoubia Marrakech.
Before the tour, there was the oratory, the remains of which can be seen like the marble columns.
It consisted of 18 spans, 312 columns and 44 pillars. The mosque walls were pierced by 14 gates.
Each of the four sides of the tower, carved directly in stone, wears a different ornamentation. The ramp that allows the ascent of the tower is large enough for a man riding the grave.
Even now, historians looking at whether the source of its construction are the architects of the Koutoubia and the Giralda in Seville, as the three buildings are similar.Rabat Oudaya Garden
Long ignored, but now restored, the Tour Hassan became the emblematic figure of Rabat and the pride of its inhabitants.
The choice of building the Mohammed V mausoleum(grave) was at the feet of the tower, is symbolic of the interest of Moroccans to the monument.
Check out the beautiful Oudaya Garden just a short walk away from the mausoleum.
I have actually walked from the beach to the marina port of sala to the tour Hassan to the oudaya garden in one evening. The weather is perfect and the air is fresh in this city.
Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Leonardo da Vinci (History of Art) 02 May



Da Vinci was one of the great creative minds of the Italian Renaissance, hugely influential as an artist and sculptor but also immensely talented as an engineer, scientist and inventor.
Leonardo da Vinci was born on 15 April 1452 near the Tuscan town of Vinci, the illegitimate son of a local lawyer. He was apprenticed to the sculptor and painter Andrea del Verrocchio in Florence and in 1478 became an independent master. In about 1483, he moved to Milan to work for the ruling Sforza family as an engineer, sculptor, painter and architect. From 1495 to 1497 he produced a mural of 'The Last Supper' in the refectory of the Monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan.
Da Vinci was in Milan until the city was invaded by the French in 1499 and the Sforza family forced to flee. He may have visited Venice before returning to Florence. During his time in Florence, he painted several portraits, but the only one that survives is the famous 'Mona Lisa' (1503-1506).
In 1506, da Vinci returned to Milan, remaining there until 1513. This was followed by three years based in Rome. In 1517, at the invitation of the French king Francis I, Leonardo moved to the Château of Cloux, near Amboise in France, where he died on 2 May 1519.
The fame of Da Vinci's surviving paintings has meant that he has been regarded primarily as an artist, but the thousands of surviving pages of his notebooks reveal the most eclectic and brilliant of minds. He wrote and drew on subjects including geology, anatomy (which he studied in order to paint the human form more accurately), flight, gravity and optics, often flitting from subject to subject on a single page, and writing in left-handed mirror script. He 'invented' the bicycle, airplane, helicopter, and parachute some 500 years ahead of their time.
If all this work had been published in an intelligible form, da Vinci's place as a pioneering scientist would have been beyond dispute. Yet his true genius was not as a scientist or an artist, but as a combination of the two: an 'artist-engineer'. His painting was scientific, based on a deep understanding of the workings of the human body and the physics of light and shade. His science was expressed through art, and his drawings and diagrams show what he meant, and how he understood the world to work.
video

Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 1 comments


Masjid-e-Nabvi SAW (The Mosque Of Prophet PBUH)



In the last stage of the journey (Migration), when Prophet (pbuh) left Quba (few Kilometres from Madina) " his Camel stopped walking and sat down in an open area of"Bani-Bukhar". Holy Prophet (pbuh) said, "It is our last destination and this is Almighty Allah's will". It was the the land of two orphans- Sohail and Sahal. These two orphans did not want any cost of this land. They said, "we shall take reward of it on the Day of Judgement" .
They wanted to give their land voluntarily to beloved Prophet sallalla ho allihi wasalam, but kind hearted Holy Muhammad (pbuh) estimated its cost which was paid by Syedna Abu Bakar Siddiq (RA) from his own pocket. It was the place where the Mosque of Prophet (SAW) was decided to be built.
 In early stages it was only a piece of land where there were some graves of polytheist (Mushrakeen) and on the other side there were some trees of dates. Some parts of the land were full with rain water. In first instance all the trees were rooted out and a mosque was built which roof was very short and can be touched just raising a hand up. After this initial stage, it was constructed with mud which was brought from the place where today the grave yard of Madina (Janat-ul-Baqqi) is situated. During this construction not only the companions but Prophet Muhammad sallalla ho allihi wasalam, him self worked practically. Prophet (SAW) brought bricks and helped his companions to build this spiritual mosque.
Today's "Masjid-e-Nabvi" is the model of unique construction. Big beautiful halls, modernly constructed domes, high minarets, sliding roofs, big umbrellas and beautifully designed pillars and artistic ceilings are really incredible.
Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Masjid E Quba The Quba Mosque (Quba' Masjid or Masjid al-Quba)



Quba is the place on the outskirts of Madinah where the Prophet (s.a.w.), accompanied by Abu Bakr (r.a.) arrived and first stayed after emigrating from Makkah. They arrived on Monday 12th Rab’i al-Awwal, fourteen years after Prophethood and this date marks the beginning of the Islamic calendar (Hijra). (16th July 622 CE). A masjid was established here by the Prophet (s.a.w.), the first to be built in Islam.
- The virtue of Masjid Qubas is mentioned in the following Quranic verse in Surah Taubah:
“...certainly a masjid founded on piety from the very first day is more deserving that you should stand in it...” [9:108]
- The Prophet (s.a.w) said: “He who purifies himself at his home and comes to Masjid Quba and offers two rakats therein, will be rewarded the reward of an Umrah (lesser pilgrimage).” [Sunan ibn Majah]
- The people of Yathrib (which was later named Al-Madinah Al-Munawwarah, the Enlightened City) had long awaited the Prophet (s.a.w.), and each day they would go beyond the fields and palm groves and wait for him until the sun became unbearable. One day the people returned to their homes after waiting a long time for the Prophet. A Jew happened to catch a glimpse of a small group of white-robed travellers in the distance. He called out: “O people of Arabia! What you have been waiting for has arrived!”
- The Muslims lifted their weapons and rushed to greet the Prophet (s.a.w.). There was a great clamour as everyone ran to the edge of the desert to catch a glimpse of the travellers. The Prophet (s.a.w.) then turned toward the right and came to Banu Amr bin Auf at Quba. Most of the Muslims who had emigrated from Makkah had stayed at Quba and many of them were there when the Prophet (s.a.w.) arrived.
- After reaching Quba, the Prophet (s.a.w.) dismounted. Those of the Ansar (literally meaning ‘the supporters’, the name given to those in Al-Madinah who became Muslim) who had not seen the Prophet (s.a.w.) thought that Abu Bakr (r.a.) was the prophet because his hair had grown a little gray. But when they saw Abu Bakr shade the Prophet (s.a.w.) with a sheet, they realized their mistake.
- It was a time of great joy from both sides. The Prophet (s.a.w.) addressed them saying:
“O People, give unto one another greetings of peace; feed food unto the hungry; honour the ties of kinship, pray in the hours when men sleep. Even so shall ye enter paradise in peace.”
- On arriving in the village of Quba after the blessed Hijra (migration), the Prophet (s.a.w.) stayed for several days in the house of Kulthoom bin Hadm (r.a.) and laid the foundations of Masjid Quba on his land. Prior to the migration of the Prophet (s.a.w.) the Muslims sometimes offered their Friday prayers at the house of Sa’ad ibn Khaithamah (r.a.) which was close by. The location of this house was included in the modern day extension of Masjid Quba but the location of the house of Kulthoom bin Hadm (r.a.) is marked by a few boulders to the south-west of Masjid Quba.
- The Prophet (s.a.w.) personally carried stones, rocks and sand with his companions for the construction work. Al-Tabarani quoted Al-Shimous Bint Al-Nuaman as saying, “I saw the Prophet when he constructed this mosque. He used to carry stones and rocks on his back until it was bent. I also saw dust on his dress and belly. But when one of his companions would come to take the load off him, he would say no and ask the companion to go and carry a similar load instead.”
- Ali (r.a.) stayed on for three days after the Prophet (s.a.w.) secretly left Makkah for Madinah. During this period he settled all the Prophet’s (s.a.w.) affairs in Makkah. He then left on foot and met up with the Prophet (s.a.w.) in Quba.
- Narrated by Abdullah bin Dinar: Ibn 'Umar (r.a.) said, "The Prophet used to go to the Mosque of Quba every Saturday (sometimes) walking and (sometimes) riding."
- Prophet Muhammad (s.a.w.) led the first group prayer from Quba Mosque when Al-Aqsa Mosque in Al-Quds (Jerusalem) was the Qibla at the time. That Friday he left Quba with Abu Bakr (r.a.). He sent a message to Banu Najjar, the house of his maternal grandfather. His kinsmen came to Quba and joined the Prophet (s.a.w.) on his way to Madinah.
References:
History of Madinah Munawwarah – Dr. Muhammad Ilyas Abdul Ghani
When the Moon Split – Safiur Rahman Mubarakpuri
Muhammad – Martin Lings
History of Madina – Ali Hafiz
Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Sir Joshua Reynolds (British Painter Died on 20 April)



Sir Joshua Reynolds, (born July 16, 1723, Plympton, Devon, Eng.—died Feb. 23, 1792, London), portrait painter and aesthetician who dominated English artistic life in the middle and late 18th century. Through his art and teaching, he attempted to lead British painting away from the indigenous anecdotal pictures of the early 18th century toward the formal rhetoric of the continental Grand Style. With the founding of the Royal Academy in 1768, Reynolds was elected its first president and knighted by King George III.
video

Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments


Taq-i Kisra (Alcove of Kisra)



Taq-i Kisra, which means Iwan of Khusraw, was once the palatial complex of Sasanian King Anushirvan Khusraw (531-79). The standing iwan and the fa�ade of this palace face east.
Although it is not clear which of the Sasanian kings built this palace, two hypotheses exist. Highlighting the classical motifs used in the fa�ade, Oscar Reuther argues for a late antique date. Herzfeld, believing that Western methodology cannot be adopted to date buildings of the East, uses historical sources to date the construction. Herzfeld points to a passage from a Sasanian Chronicle, Khudhay-Nama, translated by the great Persian translator Ibn Muqaffa (721-757/9) in which the ruins of the Taq-i Kisra have been attributed to the reign of Shapur I (241-72), the first Sasanian King. Although the destruction of the palace is blamed on different individuals by various sources, Abbasid caliph Al-Mansur (754-775) is most commonly mentioned for its ruin.
Only parts of the great iwan and the southern wing of the fa�ade remain of this palace. On either side of the parabolic arch of the entry iwan were high brick walls divided into six stories with architraves. Of the remaining part of the faade, each story has a different arrangement of blind arches and engaged columns. Although the general disposition of the faade suggests Hellenistic and Roman influences, their strict classical principles are not fully observed.
Considering the present state of the palace, its layout can only be reconstructed based on archaeological evidence. Overall, the plan was organized symmetrically along the axis of the portal. On either side of the forty-eight meter entry iwan, were large rectangular rooms served by corridors that wrapped around the iwan. The entry iwan led, through a narrow passageway, to a central hall covered with a vault identical to that of the iwan. This hall was also served by corridors on two sides and had two large rectangular rooms on either side. A series of maze-like corridors and rooms flanked the passageway connecting the entry iwan and the central hall. A large paved court in front of the palace was used by Khusraw to address his subjects.
As the rooms within this complex are extremely large in scale, their use must have been limited to ceremonial functions, with royal residential spaces located elsewhere. Textual sources refer to the great entry iwan as the place where Khusraw's throne was placed. According to Tabari, Khusraw's crown had been so heavy that it had to be suspended from the vault of the iwan. A large curtain was also used to separate the space of the iwan from the court in front.
In Sasanian architecture, vaults could be built either with or without centering devices. In Taq-i Kisra, the iwan vault was constructed without the use of any centering devices. Famous for being the largest vaulted space ever built, this iwan was constructed by slanting the walls until they met at a point. This type of construction, where no scaffolding was used to generate a well-rounded shape, produced a parabolic arch.
Like most other monuments in the Mesopotamian region, Taq-i Kisra was built primarily in brick. Shards of glass mosaic found in the vicinity suggest that mosaics were used for decoration. Arab historian, Qazwini also refers to an illustration of Khusraw mounted on a yellow horse, now lost, on the wall of the throne room, in the entry iwan. Marble was also used on interior surfaces. All the decorative elements for the palace were imported from Syria.
Next Video | Add Comment | Related Videos | Go Up | Previous Video

Read More Add your Comment 0 comments